Posted by: Bruce Proctor | September 29, 2017

Edgar Cayce, Dolores Cannon, and the New Testament

9-28-17

I’ve been looking online the past couple days for a better version of Edgar Cayce’s Story of Jesus than the beat-up, dog-eared, thick-with-annotations mass market paperback I’ve used for years. A.R.E., Cayce’s publisher, offers basically only these small, cheap editions which quickly wear out if you’re at all serious about them. Small, cheap bindings, often unread for decades before I find them, tanning, and of course they don’t hold up.

Why was I looking? The trance-channeled life readings as presented in here–in fact all Cayce’s books– are terribly unwieldy. The past-life readings themselves meander toward their main points, the historical dates of readings often overlapping and thus not in good overall sequence–and hugely: the language Cayce’s source uses is King James or worse archaic language, tortured, often incomprehensible syntax (largely attributable I believe to Cayce’s lifelong Christian fundamentalism, of his reading the KJ Bible cover to cover every year.) Some dating issues here are undoubtedly inevitable, but good editing could make a huge difference. I also find the small size pages unconducive.

Cayce’s source often seems to me to be slavishly and annoyingly true to New Testament tales and theology, taking many of the most outlandish occurrences as, a-hem, “Gospel,” and expounding what “really” happened.  Hundreds of people who came to him for past life readings were told that, among their other lifetimes, they were involved prominently or peripherally in well-known NT situations.

That said, after the number of years I’ve been studying the early Christian movement and times, and have delved deeply enough to know many facts (and conjectures) about this that few do, when I read Cayce these days on early Christianity, he says things that curiously corroborate and often expand on or explain many things about it than what is currently “known.” For instance, I read last night that James, the brother of Christ, was slain by sword in a (presumably anti-Christian) riot, which contradicts the flimsiest currently available conjecture of what happened.

But there is much there: the mixture of populations in the holy land, of Jews, Greeks, Romans, Samaritans, even Phoenicians, as they wove over generations. Overarching everything else, I suppose, is Cayce’s documentation of Jesus’s connections with the Essenes, long before the Dead Sea Scrolls made them famous.

What I was hoping to find, I suppose, was a text that had synoptically laid out the tantalizing concurrences in the NT, Cayce’s readings, and Dolores Cannon’s Jesus and the Essenes, (which for me has become the quintessential demonstration that modern past-life regression might be useful as a validatible scientific, historical tool.)

I did not find the text I sought. What I did find was perhaps the most obscure text I’ve ever found–and I’ve storied my life with many. (Check out if you can, The Sorry Tale by Patience Worth. If you’re turned on to Shakespeare, this remarkable piece of literature could conceivably be your cup of tea.) What I found: The A. R. E. listed a hardcover Edgar Cayce Library Series (Volume 6): The Early Christian Epoch which on the website did have the Table of Contents–nothing more, but exactly the time frame and subject matter I was looking for. Where my paperback had 190 pages of pertinent material, this volume says it has all the pertinent Cayce readings dealing with that era, and it’s 600 pages long. I found the one copy (of 4) at an unfairy-tale price, swallowed hard, and ordered it.

One thing my couple nights of looking showed me is that few if any “serious” biblical scholars are taking Cayce seriously. I don’t know how seriously I take it. It would be a gargantuan task for someone like me–a fool’s errand to most of the world–but this stuff hangs together, not conclusively by any stretch (if there is anything conclusive regarding biblical scholarship!), but intriguing, intriguing, intriguing.

I could start compiling a bibliography, at least, of my odd scholarship: Renard, Charles Hapgood, the Proto-Evangelum of James, the Nepalese Jesus manuscript, Seth, Michael. . .

I could simply pick out some especially important data points from the 3 pivotal texts, and compare them: for instance, Jesus’ brothers and sisters, the stable, the fleeing to Egypt, Mary at the Temple, Essene equality of women with men, Suddi, Judy, and Dolores as convincing characters.

Credibility would hinge much for a student or reader on a their expanding their worldview toward what I call “The Emerging Paradigm.”

If I were to develop this NT-Cayce-Cannon study, it might assist a handful of intrepid scholar-explorers in the next couple generations. You can lay it out there and see what sticks. 

(btw, I am gathering an outline of that paradigm, which has been a major if frequently obscure passion of my life. Many, many are involved with it, in dozens of disciplines and contexts, a great many of them probably unknown to each other, most of them probably beyond the current boundaries of academia.)

 

 

Advertisements
Posted by: Bruce Proctor | April 3, 2017

Photo: Mike’s Cove as Saturday’s snow was ending

2017-04-01-002

I was out shoveling as last Saturday’s snowfall eased off, and I saw this in Mike’s Cove off our driveway. This seems like a remarkable photograph to me. What do you think?

For about three months I’ve made basically no photographs. Over the last ten days I’ve had three sessions of remarkable photographs, so the drought seems over.

The six inches of very heavy and dense late-season snow from this last storm Friday night and Saturday, by today, Monday, is already almost entirely gone already. The sunny porch right now is warm with spring.

Posted by: Bruce Proctor | April 3, 2017

Photos from Winnegance Bridge

2017-03-30-021-Edit

Last Thursday, a bright, sunny day, I noticed the surface of the inner cove off the Winnegance Bridge a couple hundred yards from me as I turned off toward home, looked amazing: rhythmic hummocking of ice, snow, and meltwater. I drove back with camera and tripod in fifteen minutes or so, and the possibilities were still there.

2017-03-30-031

Posted by: Bruce Proctor | March 25, 2017

Dream of the Elephant God

Dream. I’ve been invited to the house of a couple in their late 30’s in Salt Lake City for an informal spiritual get-together. They have each written their own book on their takes on spirituality/well-being. They are beautiful, energetic, competitive: which book will prove the better spirituality? Spas, diet, spiritual retreats.

I am looking at the woman’s book. Its author photo in the back shows the author naked, spreadeagled, inviting. Some odd spirituality!

Then others arrive, a couple from India, in gorgeous Indian traditional garb. I’m lounging in the adjacent back room. The couple come in and recline beside me, the man throwing his arm across my chest in his gorgeous costume. Is he a prince? Such casual intimacy. I find myself holding him bit by bit, and he is welcoming that. Nothing sexual, just human warmth and love. I find it immensely comforting–maybe because it’s so rare.

In the front room there is now an Indian god idol, an elephant, lavishly, lovingly festooned, costumed, with intricate inlays of jewels, ivory. I realize that this god is a personification of the Indian couple’s inner selves and that each precious adornment is a loving, creative act manifesting their own inner perfection.

The host owners have a daughter, maybe nine years old, blonde, lively, and innocent– that they have raised in the most unusual manner, I assume, because: I’m lying down in the back room. She comes up to me and asks if she can “swap mouth liquids” with me. I say, “Certainly not, but you may pass me a Kleenex.” Later she expectorates into a basin and a great volume of orange juice gushes forth. Later the Indian man comes in and expectorates his own quart of orange juice! Is this some purification ritual?

The girl is most forthcoming to me, entirely at ease with herself, and, although not directly sexual, I realize would welcome sex with someone she likes–even me–even at such a young age. Such maturity, to do that in such openness and awareness at such an age!

On the kitchen table I notice a little creature, in translucent colors, like a gummy bear, but dazzling, two inches tall, moving and dancing about. I call attention to it, and realize now this whole evening has been a dream!  –which startles me so much that I wake up. The girl says, “Oh, that’s such a pity! By coming awake, you’ve lost the power you would have had by waking up in the dream.”

Posted by: Bruce Proctor | March 25, 2017

Photos: Reflections off the foil on my mom’s new chocolate cake

As usual, these aren’t faked. I passed my mom’s cake sitting by the fridge on my way through the kitchen and said, “Whoa!” I did not manipulate anything in making these photographs other than rotate the cake this way and that and square up the camera to what I saw.

2017-03-20-037-Edit

2017-03-20-049-Edit

2017-03-20-015-Edit

2017-03-20-011-Edit

Older Posts »

Categories